The truth about juice cleanses: Are they worth it?

Juice cleanses may help you lose weight, but all that glitters isn't gold, ladies.

Sonaakshi Kohli Sonaakshi Kohli Jul 27, 2017
Juice cleanses may seem like a great idea, but they are not. Photo: Shutterstock/IndiaPicture

 

When it comes to losing inches quickly to fit into that dress for a big event or getting a bikini body before a beach vacay or simply shedding some post-vacation weight within a few days, going on a juice detox seems to be everyone's best bet. After all, its benefits like--quick weight loss, healthy skin, and well, ridding the body of toxins--are glorified so much.

But as they say, all that glitters is not gold, so this diet fad has a downside too.

According an article in the Daily Mail, juice cleanses "are not actually a healthy thing to do".

Let's Start With The Real Question: Does Your Body Really Need a Cleanse?When it comes to the 'detoxing' part, our bodies simply don't need it, practicing dietitian, Kathryn Hawkins told the website.

She suggested ditching sugary, oily, and processed foods for fresh fruits, vegetables, proteins, and wholegrain if you really want to give your body a break.

All That Weight Loss is a LieThere is no denying the fact that a juice cleanse can make you feel and even weigh lighter. But you know what? That's just you losing some water weight--nothing else. Unfortunately, you can't be on a juice cleanse all your life and so, that weight is going to come back and bite you in the ass as soon as you get back to your normal diet.

They Spell Doom For Your Precious MusclesIf you spend hours at the gym trying to gain some lean muscle, you would understand why we called it precious. What if we told you that these 'precious' entities of yours are in danger while you're on a juice detox?

Yes ladies, all the water loss during this cleanse can reduce your muscles to waste simply because vegetable and fruit juices are low on the much-needed protein content. Even though Australian dietitian, Susie Burrell thinks that going on a juice diet is better than other more harmful fad diets, she too finds it faulty when it comes to the nutritional aspect of it.

'Juicing' Can Even Goof Up Your Sugar Levels"If followed for a short (3-5 day) period, you will drop a couple of kg and feel lighter and more energised as a result. The biggest issue nutritionally is that fruit juice in particular is packed full of sugar, up to 30-40g or 6-8 teaspoons per glass," Burrel said.

"As such, drinking large volumes of fruit based juice plays havoc with both glucose and insulin levels long term," she added.

However, if you're still keen on trying this method, she suggests focusing on having vegetable juice more to keep your sugar levels in check.

Also read: Should you really try intermittent fasting to lose weight? Here's what the experts have to say.

 

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