Is this popular fashion brand going genderless?

Imagine you enter a showroom to buy clothes and there is no women's section.

Sonaakshi Kohli Sonaakshi Kohli Nov 14, 2017
Zara's winter collection is unisex. Photo Courtesy: Zara.com

 

Not so long ago, I had written about how men are embracing the "feminine" lacey lingerie in life. Before that, I had also mentioned about how school boys in England ditched pants for skirts to beat the 34-degree heatwave earlier this year. Only yesterday, I came across the news about England Church urging teachers to let boys wear tiaras and tutus.

And on that note, I thought that this idea will take its own sweet time to make it to the Indian fashion block since Aamir Khan wearing nose rings and Ranveer Singh turning up in skirts is yet to register in the rigid minds of so many people in our country.  

"Why so serious?" I thought to myself then and decided to divert my mind off gender-neutrality and concentrate on the fashion part more.

What next? With Zara creating buzz for making its website functional for Indian customers recently, I decided to shop online and cash in on their newly launched feature only to find out that even the Spanish brand seems to be quite smitten with the idea of gender fluidity.

Why do I say that? Well, because upon searching for winter coats, I was in for a pleasant surprise when I saw female models wearing coats marked as being from Zara Man.

In fact, the intensity of my surprise--rather shock--made me switch to Google just to make sure that it wasn't a technical fault in the the app or just a side-effect of my in-depth reading and writing on gender neutrality.

However, a report in the Daily Mail confirmed that my observations were right.

The only problematic part was the fact that gender-neutral pieces were still marked in two different categories namely--Zara Man and Zara Women.

Perhaps, a unisex section would have been more suitable in this case. But I am glad that at least they are trying to blur the lines between genders and breaking stereotypes.

This comes a year after the brand launched the "Ungendered" line with a 16-piece collection of unisex items including jeans, shorts, sweatshirts, shirts, and jumpers--all in neutral colours (black, white, grey). This range too was modelled by both men and women.

However, what makes their second innings of genderless fashion more fascinating is that this time around, it is available for Indian customers as well. Now, I can't wait to see how it fares in our country. Fingers crossed!

 

 

 

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